About Me

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Born in Taipei, grew up in Nashville, TN, and even stayed for college. Moved back to Taiwan after college to live two years as an American girl in Taipei. Cultures clashed, traditions mixed, languages blended… and it was all one big mess. This blog started out with my adventures as an American looking Taiwanese (but really too tanned to count), acting too much like an American in Taiwan. Confused yet? I certainly was.

From there, I then spent a year living in HonoluluHawaii, which is truly paradise, heaven on earth, full of rainbows and sunshine, and all the other splendid things in life.

Since then, I’ve moved to San Francisco, CA, making it home.

This blog is full of travel, food, and adventures.

Contact me at tinawu08 [at] gmail [dot] com if you want travel tips, good restaurant suggestions, fun touristy activities, or even life advice. (But no promises on that last one.)

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20 thoughts on “About Me

  1. Pam Osabel says:

    I work with John Bardos of JetSetCitizen.com and YouCanTeachEnglish.com and we would love to interview you by email to ask you some questions about teaching English in Taiwan. It should only take about 30 minutes of your time and we will promote your interview on Twitter and StumbleUpon. Please let me know if you are interested.

    Thanks!

  2. kaifu says:

    I found the whole Taiwanese-Americans-living-in-Taiwan experience very fascinating, and have been adding blogs and following tweets of this sort. I wished I had done the same upon graduating, but Taipei in those days (ahem) wasn’t quite the same as now. Still, I enjoyed my trips to Taiwan in recent year, particularly the one I took this past November.

  3. Matt says:

    Tina,
    I have been reading and enjoying your blog about your experiences teaching English in Taiwan. I wondered if you would be able to give my wife and I some info about how to go about doing job searches for teaching english in Taipei. I’d really appreciate any advice or help you could give us in our plans. We are just starting our job search and didn’t know if you had any websites or schools we should contact or any that we should maybe avoid?? Your blog is great and I hope I get to write one if we do end up finding something over there. Thanks so much. Matt

    • Tina says:

      Hi Matt,

      You should definitely look into http://www.tealit.com. It’s a great resource for foreigners teaching English in Taiwan, ranging from housing listings to job listings and lots of other information.

      esl99.com also has job listings to give you an idea of who’s hiring, where they’re located, what to expect.

      Another great resource to contact is asianconsultants.com, and they set English teachers up with teaching positions around Taipei. You could send them an email to let them know you’re coming, but asides from the big schools like Hess or Giraffe, most of the other schools would want to meet you in person when you get here so it’s harder to guaranteed a job before you land in Taipei. Hope this helps, feel free to send me any more questions.

      • Matt says:

        Tina, Thanks so much for responding and suggesting the websites. I have been looking them up and it seems that I either need to make contact with the schools (emailing seems to be the slowest, and I hear calling is a better way of contacting them) or an agency. I wondered about how much using asian consultants will cost? Did you use them, or do you know anyone who did and how much they were charged? I have emailed them but am not sure how long they will take to respond. Thanks again for your help.

  4. johnny - onestep4ward.com says:

    Hey tina,

    nice blog 🙂 I’m trying to weigh up between vietnam and taiwan for my next stint! Im irish but the last 4 years i’ve been living in Korea, Thailand and now Australia. Going to Malaysia to study part-time but thinking about setting up in Taiwan and studying by correspondence for my MA. How much money do u manage to save each month there? Have u been to Vietnam?

    • Tina says:

      I can save about 20,000-30,000NT a month. I spend most of my money on food and eating out. No, I haven’t been to Vietnam but I do have a friend there teaching English now.

  5. Matt says:

    Tina,

    Thanks again for your advice with Asian Consultants. I am almost done with their questionnaire and will be submitting it this week! Wish me luck! Can you tell me more about your experience with them? What was the process or steps after you submitted your resume and other forms to them? Hope you and your Didi are feeling better after your accident. Matt

    • Tina says:

      After the paperwork, you just meet up with them so they’ll get to know you better and see what kind of school would be a good fit. After the interview, they’ll start hooking you up with schools for interviews until you find a school you like. That’s it! Good luck, Matt!

  6. Liane Jeng says:

    Tina,I have been reading and enjoying your blog about your experiences teaching English in Taiwan. I wondered if you would be able to give my wife and I some info about how to go about doing job searches for teaching english in Taipei. I’d really appreciate any advice or help you could give us in our plans. We are just starting our job search and didn’t know if you had any websites or schools we should contact or any that we should maybe avoid?? Your blog is great and I hope I get to write one if we do end up finding something over there. Thanks so much. Matt
    +1

    • Huanger says:

      you should check out some of Tina’s previous responses to other bloggers. She already answered most of your questions.

      Also, I don’t know how strict Tina is about being upright and legal, but you will need a work visa in order to work at the legit schools. Some of the smaller chains (like Happy Marian) and kindergarten-style schools may turn the other way, however, and pay cash.

      • Tina says:

        Haha, thanks Huanger! I was just about to say the same thing myself.

        Matt, if you would please read into the other comments and under FAQ’s for your questions, that would be great! If you still have any questions afterwards, I’d be happy to help.

  7. Charlotte says:

    Dear madam, dear sir,

    My name is Charlotte Van Parys. I’m from Belgium. I’m currently finishing my master degree in Multilingual Professional Communication at the University of Antwerp. To achieve this degree I have to write a dissertation. I’m very interested in other cultures, their habits, way of life, language… So I decided to write my dissertation about an interesting culture, Taiwan.

    The more exact subject of my master dissertation is “the intercultural aspects in the communication with the Taiwanese”. For my investigation I’m using quotes from blogs from people who live and work or study in Taiwan. I was reading your blog and I was wandering if I could use some of your stories about your experiences in Taiwan. I promise to not abuse this information.

    Sincerely,
    Charlotte Van Parys

    • Tina says:

      Dear Charlotte,

      That would be fine. All the content written here on this blog are mine, and you are welcome to use what you need. Thanks for your interest.

  8. Richard Su says:

    Hi Tina,

    I’m real glad to stumble onto your website. I’m in the States now too and thinking of going to Taiwan to teach for a year or two. Do you have any ideas as to whether it is possible to take on more hours or other PT jobs? I think the normal FT job might not be enough for me to cover some expenses in the States and would need to make more on PT jobs. Any advice you have would be appreciated!

    • Tina says:

      Hi Richard,

      It is possible to take on more hours or other PT jobs. It’s all about how many hours you want. Normally, what would happen is that you would one job with a school consisting of how many hours, usually 25-30 hours teaching classes (Hess and other bigger chain schools do 40 hours right off the bat), and then if you would like more hours, you can ask the school for more private tutoring hours with kids who need help. Or you can always go out and find students who want private tutors. The possibilities are endless.

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